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Monday, 08 November 2010 11:48

Intel plans aggressive Sandy Bridge transition

Written by Nermin Hajdarbegovic


Massive share increase throughout 2011
Intel has rather ambitious plans for its new Sandy Bridge architecture and it is currently projecting that Sandy will make up close to 20 percent of its desktop shipments in Q1, while the share should jump to around 75 percent by the end of 2011.

The first Sandy Bridge based processors should start to trickle into OEM stocks before the end of the year, under Core i5 and Core i7 brands. However, they will have a negligible effect on overall shipments with a total market share of about 2 percent.

Things will get much more interesting in Q1 2011, when Intel plans to introduce Sandy Bridge based Core i3 parts. They should make up around 8 percent of total sales in Q1, while Core i5 share should jump to 7 percent as well. The Core i7 share should double to 2 percent. By the end of Q1, the total Sandy Bridge share should come close to the 20 percent mark.

In Q2 2011 Intel will introduce its first Sandy Bridge based Pentiums, which will bring the new architecture closer to the masses. Although the Pentium series parts will start off with a share of about 5 percent in Q2, shipments are expected to triple in Q3 and by the end of the year Sandy Bridge Pentiums will account for roughly 25 percent of total Intel desktop shipments. The Core i3 will see somewhat slower growth, but it will also end the year with a similar share. Basically every second Intel desktop CPU sold in Q4 will be either a Core i3 or a Pentium based on the new Sandy Bridge core.

In the performance and high end segments, Sandy Bridge will also have a sizable chunk of the market in Q4. Core i5 will make up over 20 percent of total shipments, while Core i7 parts will account for 3 to 4 percent.

Clearly we are looking at a very ambitious transition plan, as Sandy Bridge will start to dominate nearly all market segments by mid-2011. AMD will have a tough time keeping up with Intel's aggressive strategy, but we are confident that the red team will manage to deliver competitive products as well, mainly in the mid-range and entry level market segments.
Last modified on Monday, 08 November 2010 19:07
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+7 #1 Shurik_tambourine 2010-11-08 12:17
"AMD will have a tough time keeping up with Intel's aggressive strategy, but we are confident that the green team will manage to deliver competitive products as well, mainly in the mid-range and entry level market segments."

What do mean only mid range and entry products????

Once the Bulldozer cores come out AMD would basically snatch out Intel's share of the high end market.

Not to mention that the Fusion cores would be easily able to compete with the Sandy Bridge

I don't get why most article writers are so biased to intel :o
 
 
+1 #2 loadwick 2010-11-08 12:33
The last thing Intel said about Ivy Bridge is that its still on track for 2H 2011 so Intel has be aggressive!

Any more news on the proper Sandy Bridge chips, LGA-2011?

Bulldozer is looking nice and i truly hope its another Athlon64 or Opteron. Could someone confirm to me that is it going to be 28nm? Some people are saying 32nm but i thought GF ditched 32nm for 28nm???
 
 
+12 #3 nele 2010-11-08 12:43
Quoting Shurik_tambouri ne:
"AMD will have a tough time keeping up with Intel's aggressive strategy, but we are confident that the green team will manage to deliver competitive products as well, mainly in the mid-range and entry level market segments."

What do mean only mid range and entry products????

Once the Bulldozer cores come out AMD would basically snatch out Intel's share of the high end market.

Not to mention that the Fusion cores would be easily able to compete with the Sandy Bridge

I don't get why most article writers are so biased to intel :o


Well, even if Bulldozer manages to be a huge success, it will be targeted at the high end market for the better part of next year, so that's a relatively low market share...

Fusion cores will probably be able to compete with some Sandy parts, but i doubt AMD will manage to cover the entire range with competitive products. However, AMD will probably offer much better value for money and superior graphics.

As for my alleged bias, I haven't bought a single Intel desktop CPU since 2000, not because I'm a fanboy but because AMD usually delivers better value for money. However, I've never bought an AMD-based notebook. ;-)
 
 
0 #4 noypogs16 2010-11-08 18:26
no to sandy bridge... graphics sucks but yes to fusion and bulldozer, ati, and nvidia
 
 
+2 #5 arclight 2010-11-08 18:59
Quoting Shurik_tambouri ne:
Once the Bulldozer cores come out AMD would basically snatch out Intel's share of the high end market.


We don't know that for a fact. I would remain cautious untill i see real benchmarks of Buldozer highend desktop CPUs. And they will be released when? It will be though for AMD to catch up in the high end segment when they keep delaying CPUs based on new arhitectures. I am hoping AMD learns from their competition and start showing up to the fight like they do with their graphics cards. I mean why couldn't we get a bastardized Buldozer based CPU on 45 nm? Would it have been really that impossible? I think not, my guess is that they wanted really bad to integrate the GPU even in their highend parts and failed on 45nm node. My 2 cents.
 
 
+4 #6 Naterm 2010-11-08 20:05
Quoting loadwick:
The last thing Intel said about Ivy Bridge is that its still on track for 2H 2011 so Intel has be aggressive!

Any more news on the proper Sandy Bridge chips, LGA-2011?

Bulldozer is looking nice and i truly hope its another Athlon64 or Opteron. Could someone confirm to me that is it going to be 28nm? Some people are saying 32nm but i thought GF ditched 32nm for 28nm???


No one really knows much about the replacement for LGA-1366. Everyone assumed LGA-2011 but there is also LGA-1356 floating around.

As for GloFo dropping 32nm for 28nm, that's the bulk node used for graphics. AMD processors ship on silicon-on-insulator and will be 32nm.
 
 
-1 #7 Bl0bb3r 2010-11-08 21:15
Quoting arclight:
[...] It will be though for AMD to catch up in the high end segment when they keep delaying CPUs based on new arhitectures. [...]



AMD's Bulldozser is a module design, which means they can use it in mid-end as well as high-end... but catching up, there's not much to catch up too, maybe in price. Sure, intel has a really fast chip, thanks to their numerous R&D teams and fabs, and even so AMD still manages to innovate and hopefully they'll keep compatibility alive as they did with AM2->AM3. As for Fusion, there won't be Bulldozer Fusion for a year if not more, so I get the 45nm node point, but what if they needed better steppings to come out with a good product from the start to get marketshare so they delayed?
 
 
+3 #8 Shurik_tambourine 2010-11-09 05:46
@nele

you do have a point there
sorry about the post... was in a bad mood then :-|
 
 
-4 #9 genetix 2010-11-09 07:06
It's rather funny marketing here since AMD started dropping the news up.

Intel doesn't have a single core on market worth buying in their price range.

Only even close worth mentioning are XEON E5630-E5640 and even those are way too expensive to have and multiplier is still too low for those prices. Not to even consider I7-970/980X. Who the hell wants an 45nm I7-920-950 fry pan on their desktop with new bad stepping.

So, by just looking these anyone can make conclusion to buy AMD straight up as INTEL doesn't seem to have even proper cores on twice the cost to offer for their customers.

Why would Intel Sandy Bridge be any different ?
 
 
-3 #10 East17 2010-11-09 10:33
And I plan to agressively NOT buy any of INTEL's products :)
 

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