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Monday, 15 November 2010 07:00

GPU-Z throttles the GTX 580 back up

Written by Slobodan Simic
gpu-z_logonvidia

Wizzard conjures its magic

All of you have probably already heard and seen Nvidia's latest trick with which its GTX 580 card simply throttles down once it hits its power consumption peak. Nvidia's throttling came to a bitter end as Wizzard from TechpowerUp site has conjured up its new version of GPU-Z software that can go around Nvidia's throttling function.

With throttling, Nvidia made sure that the TDP remained pretty low as the clock speed throttling logic simply reduced the clock speeds once it hit the magic number. It has also prevented the card to work at its full potential and has prevented most of the review sites to use Furmark or OCCT in order to push it to its limits. Overclockers were keen to see how fast this card could go and now it's a simple matter of running the new GPU-Z with the "/GTX580OCP" command-line.

Of course, TechPowerup was quick to note that they are not responsible for any damage caused by this. They also ran Furmark test in order to see the "real" power consumption and guess what, it is really somewhere at 350W, at least when pushed by Furmark.

You can find out more here.


Last modified on Monday, 15 November 2010 10:38
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