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Monday, 01 July 2013 12:56

US attacks China on cyber spying

Written by Nick Farrell

It is OK when we do it

In a stonking display of “pot calling the kettle black” the US government has attacked China for electronically spying on other countries.

In a week were it was revealed that the US was even spying on its friends in the EU, this might strike the rest of the world as being a mite hypocritical, but given the fact the country was founded on the lie that it was being oppressed by Britain, what can we expect?

US Treasury Secretary Jack Lew has said he will keep up pressure on China over cyber security, especially stealing of intellectual property and trade secrets. His view is that it is ok for both sides to spy on each other, but when you take trade secrets from the companies who keep their political sockpuppet’s drinks cabinets and campaign funds full, there becomes a problem.

Not surprisingly China accused U.S. of "double standards" in cyber security after the flight from Hong Kong of fugitive former spy agency contractor Edward Snowden, who leaked details of US cyber surveillance tactics.

Nick Farrell

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