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Monday, 15 July 2013 10:28

Microsoft calls for Android enforcement

Written by Nick Farrell

Keep it out of the US

Microsoft, which won a ban last year on importing some phones made by a Google subsidiary, has now asked a US court to enforce the measure.

In May 2012 the ITC heard that Google's Motorola Mobility infringed a Microsoft patent for generating and synchronizing calendar items. It barred any infringing Motorola Mobility device from being imported into the United States. Google said that it should have applied to only some Motorola Mobility Android phones. Microsoft has complained that the order is still not being enforced.

Customs and Bureau Protection has repeatedly allowed Motorola to evade that order based on secret presentations that CBP has refused to share with Microsoft, Microsoft said. Google argued that Microsoft tried to broaden the order beyond what the ITC had intended.

Matt Kallman, a Google spokesman said that the US Customs appropriately rejected Microsoft's effort to broaden its patent claims to block Americans from using a wide range of legitimate calendar functions, like scheduling meetings, on their mobile phones.

Nick Farrell

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