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Tuesday, 06 August 2013 10:43

UK IT managers have not got a clue about BYOD

Written by Nick Farrell



Keeping them up at night

The majority of UK IT leaders still do not have a handle on adopting the BYOD trend into their organisations, according to a new survey.

The survey published by AppSense shows that 67 per cent of IT leaders cite coming up with BYOD IT policy as a major challenge, despite a similar amount 69 per cent of them already supplying two or more devices to employees. The report, entitled BYOD: Bridging the Gap, aggregates the views of 100 IT leaders and 1,000 employees in the UK.

It said half of IT departments believe that meeting end-user expectations around corporate IT plans remains a significant problem. This is worrying when you consider that 78 per cent of IT leaders also admitted to experiencing an internal push from employees to implement BYOD policies and that 60 per cent of devices offered to employees are mobile. While 67 per cent of IT leaders suggest they do have a BYOD policy in place, almost half admit this is not clearly defined when it comes to managing mobile phones and tablets. And with more than a fifth of employees now actively using tablets in the workplace, it highlights that IT leaders do not yet have a handle on the full impacts BYOD will have on their businesses. 

Nick Lowe, Vice President Sales and General Manager, EMEA said that the defining factor of BYOD is freedom of user choice. But this means that BYOD instantly becomes a challenge of scale: more devices equals more operating systems, more security protocols, more application portals, more user profiles to manage consistently and more platforms to support.

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